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Thursday, January 20, 2011

Mailing That Letter You Wrote To Your Bully...Or Publishing It

So you may remember last spring when I first told you about Young Adult Authors Against Bullying (YAAAB), the ingenious organization starting by authors Megan Kelley Hall and Carrie Jones. Well, these authors have taken it one-step further and put together an anthology that’s been garnering quite a bit of buzz.



DEAR BULLY: 70 Authors Tell Their Stories
, edited by Hall and Jones, let's us share our personal bullying accounts with teens, and I’m excited and proud that I’ll have an essay in the mix with some incredible authors.

Check out the full line-up below:

Introduction by Ellen Hopkins

Dear Bully

Dear Bully by Laurie Faria Stolarz
Love Letter to My Bully by Tonya Hurley
Dear Audrey by Courtney Sheinmel
Slammed by Marlene Perez
My Apology by Marina Cohen
Dear Samantha by Kieran Scott

Just Kidding
Stench by Jon Scieszka
What I Wanted to Tell You by Melissa Schorr
Subtle Bullying by Rachel Vail
Hiding Me by R. A. Nelson
Midsummer’s Nightmare by Holly Cupala
BFFBOTT.COM by Lisa McMann
The Innocent Bully by Linda Gerber
The Secret by Heather Brewer
The Funny Guy by R. L. Stine

Survival
A List by Micol Ostow 00
There’s a Light by Saundra Mitchell
The Soundtrack to My Survival by Stephanie Kuehnert
If Mean Froze by Carrie Jones
Abuse by Lucienne Diver
The Boy Who Won’t Leave Me Alone by A. S. King
That Deep Alone by Lise Haines
break my heart by Megan Kelley Hall
End of the World by Jessica Brody
Girl Wars by Crissa-Jean Chappell
The Curtain by Deborah Kerbel

Regret
The Eulogy of Ivy O’Conner by Sophie Jordan
Regret by Lisa Yee
Karen by Nancy Werlin
Surviving Alfalfa by Teri Brown
When I Was a Bully, Too by Melissa Walker
Carol by Amy Koss
Never Shut Up by Kiersten White
The Day I Followed by Eric Luper

Thank You, Friends
The Alphabet by Laura Kasischke
They Made Me Do It and I’m Sorry by Cecil Castellucci
Simplehero by Debbie Rigaud
Isolation by Cynthia Leitich Smith
Luz by Melodye Shore
Dear Caroline from Canada by Carrie Ryan
The Blue-Eyed Girl by Jocelyn Maeve Kelley
Frenemies Are Not Friends by Michelle Zink

Insight
The Other Side by Nancy Holder
Can We Make This Letter Disappear? by Sara Bennett Wealer
Bully on the Ledge by Kurtis Scaletta
Informed Consent by Lara Zeises
Silent All These Years by Alyson Noël
Now and Then by Aprilynne Pike
STRANGERS ON A STREET by Diana Rodriguez Wallach (Look! That’s me!)
Objects in Mirror are More Complex Than They Appear by Lauren Oliver

Speak
Levels by Tanya Lee Stone
Slivers of Purple Paper by Cyn Balog
The Sound of Silence by Claudia Gabel
Starship Suburbia by Maryrose Wood
Kicking Stones at the Sun by Jo Knowles
Memory Videos by Nancy Garden
Finding Light in the Darkness by Lisa Schroeder

Write It
The Sandwich Fight by Steven Wedel
Fearless by Jeannine Garsee
Without Armor by Daniel Waters
The Seed by Lauren Kate

It Gets Better
Now by Amy Reed
Standing Tall by Dawn Metcalf
The Superdork of the Fifth-Grade Class of 1989 by Kristen Harmel
“Who Gives the Popular People Power? Who???” by Megan McCafferty
“That Kid” by Janni Lee Simner
This Is Me by Erin Dionne
Bullies for Me by Mo Willems
To Carolyn Mackler, From Elizabeth in IL
Dear Elizabeth by Carolyn Mackler

The anthology debuts this fall and has already been featured in Publisher’s Weekly and now February’s issue of Glamour magazine!





Check that out! It’s not just a little blurb in Glamour, it’s a two-page spread with a full-page photo. Don’t Megan and Carrie look great?! You can click on the photos to read the entire article. (Thanks, Melissa Walker for the links!)

Let’s hope this book brings more light to the bullying epidemic in this country. I know Megan and Carrie are already getting emails from teens about how YAAAB has had a huge impact on their lives. They’re using the Facebook page as an outlet, and many plan to contribute essays (along with other young adult authors) to the new YAAAB website that is coming soon.

Wednesday, January 12, 2011

GCC Member Laurie Faria Stolarz Gives A Touching Glimpse of the Future

Who hasn’t wished they could see the future? But if you really got your wish and every time you touched someone crazy images flashed in your brain, would you still consider it a gift? I’m not so sure, but I’d like to find out when I read GCC Member Laurie Faria Stolarz’s new novel, DEADLY LITTLE GAMES, which just debuted through Disney/Hyperion Books for Children.

As always, here’s a little bit about her book to get you hooked:

High school juniors Camelia and Ben have discovered a powerful bond: they both possess the power of psychometry, the ability to see the future through touch. For Ben, the gift is a frightening liability. When he senses a strong threat or betrayal, he risks losing control. Camelia’s gift is more mysterious. When she works with clay, her hands sculpt messages her mind doesn’t yet comprehend. Before either one has a chance to fully grasp their abilities, a new danger surfaces, but this time, Camelia is not the target. Adam, a familiar face from Ben’s past, is drawn into a puzzle he can’t solve. . . and his life is on the line. As the clues pile up, Camelia must decide whether to help him and risk losing Ben or do nothing and suffer the consequences. But in these games, who can be trusted?

Here’s what Laurie had to say:

Q: In AMIGAS AND SCHOOL SCANDALS, Mariana takes a road trip to Cornell. What’s your funniest road trip story?

Laurie: Traveling cross country Spain, not having train fare, and having to hide out in the bathroom until the conductors were completely done stamping tickets.

I've road-tripped in Spain myself! But I never managed to sneak out of train fare. Kudos!

Q: I often talk about how I didn’t always “know” I wanted to be a writer. Did you? Or did you have other plans when you were little?

Laurie: I’ve always wanted to be a writer. Since before I could even write, I was creating stories and plotlines for my dolls and having them act out plays. Then, when I actually could write, I’d write out the scripts and make edits and adjustments I went along.

Q: Throughout the AMOR series, Mariana and her friends celebrate their Sweet 16s (and 15s). What did you do for your Sweet 16 or Quinceañera?

Laurie: My friends surprised me by renting a limo which we took out on the town.

Q: I wrote the AMOR series organically, no outlines. My new manuscripts, I’ve outlined extensively. How about you? Are you an outliner?

Laurie: I’m definitely an outliner. I like knowing ahead of time what my main character wants and why and what he or she needs to learn in order to get it. My outlines do typically change as I discover things along the way, but I like the safety of an outline before I begin.

Q: Where were you when you found out that your novel was going to be published? Tell us the story.

Laurie: I actually got the contract in the mail before I even got a phone call. I thought that was a little odd, so I wasn’t really sure it was real.

Thank you, Laurie! Now, everyone go out and buy books, lots and lots of books!

Wednesday, January 5, 2011

Good Girls Go Bad With GCC Member Eileen Cook

Isn’t it every over-achiever’s dream to just not over achieve for once? To do the wrong the thing? To be the bad girl? Well, that’s exactly what GCC Member Eileen Cook explores in her new novel, THE EDUCATION OF HAILEY KENDRICK out this week through Simon Pulse.

As always, here’s a little bit about her book to get you hooked:

Hailey Kendrick always does exactly what's expected of her. She has the right friends, dates the perfect boy, gets good grades, and follows all the rules. But one night, Hailey risks everything by breaking a very big rule in a very public way...and with a very unexpected partner in crime. Hailey gets caught, but her accomplice does not, and Hailey takes the fall for both of them.

Suddenly, Hailey's perfect life--and her reputation--are blowing up in her face. Her friends are all avoiding her. Her teachers don't trust her. Her boyfriend won't even speak to her for long enough to tell her that she's been dumped.

They say honesty is the best policy--but some secrets are worth keeping, no matter the cost. Or are they?

Here’s what Eileen had to say:

Q: In AMIGAS AND SCHOOL SCANDALS, Mariana takes a road trip to Cornell. What’s your funniest road trip story?

Eileen: I somehow got involved in taking a road trip to Memphis Tennessee to see Graceland. It was completely spontaneous. You meet a lot of really interesting people at Graceland. Trust me when I tell you there are people who take their Elvis VERY seriously. I would encourage you not to laugh. Not even at the giant purple poodle wall paper in the bathroom (it was his mom’s favorite) or the collection of sparkly jumpsuits.

Now Graceland is a roadtrip. In fact, that might be the ultimate road trip destination, up there with the World’s Largest Ball of Twine (Darwin, MN).

Q: I often talk about how I didn’t always “know” I wanted to be a writer. Did you? Or did you have other plans when you were little?

Eileen: I grew up loving books and always wanted to be a writer. However, I was also open to careers as a gold winning Olympic figure skater, famous actress, singer or royalty. It’s a good thing the writing panned out.

Q: Throughout the AMOR series, Mariana and her friends celebrate their Sweet 16s (and 15s). What did you do for your Sweet 16 or Quinceañera?

Eileen: I can’t remember! That means I either had such a wild and crazy time that I blocked out the memory, or more likely that I did something small like have some friends over for a slumber party. I do remember that I went the very next day to get my drivers’ license and I couldn’t wait to borrow the car. (This despite the fact that I lived in a small town and there really wasn’t anyplace exciting to go.)

Q: I wrote the AMOR series organically, no outlines. My new manuscripts, I’ve outlined extensively. How about you? Are you an outliner?

Eileen: I am also an organic writer who now uses an outline. There’s nothing like deadlines and editors wanting to know what you are doing to motivate you to come up with an outline. I’m a firm believer that you have to put the work in somewhere. Either you write it organically and spend more time in revision, or you spend more time in the beginning in the outlining stage- either way- it’s work.

Q: Where were you when you found out that your book was going to be published? Tell us the story.

Eileen: I was walking the dogs when my agent called my cell phone to tell me the news. I had worked with my editor in the past on two other books so I was fairly confident she would publish this book, but it was still this HUGE relief and excitement. The dogs got extra cookies and I bought champagne for myself. (Not being a big fan of liver jerky like they are.)

Thank you, Eileen! Now, everyone go out and buy books, lots and lots of books!

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